Screw You, I Quit!

Screw You, I Quit!

Editor’s note: This is a guest post from Joshua Millburn.

Pay close attention, this story might be about you.

Once upon a time, there was a guy. This guy had it made. He was in his late twenties, he had a six-figure corporate job, he was well respected by his peers and subordinates and bosses at work, and he seemed passionate and friendly and outgoing and successful. He was living the corporate dream.

People saw his nice house with more bedrooms than inhabitants, his luxury car, his new gadgets, and his life of opulence and thought, I want to be like that guy. They saw all of those things—all of that superfluous stuff—and they just knew he was successful.

But he wasn’t successful at all. Maybe he was ostensibly successful—displaying his status symbols as if they were trophies—but he wasn’t actually successful. The people who envied his life didn’t see the other side, they didn’t see the life behind the curtain. He did a good job of masking his fear, his debt, his anxiety, his stress, his loneliness, his guilt, his depression. He displayed a impressive facade, revealing only what he thought the world wanted him to reveal.

A Life Without Happiness

Worst of all, he wasn’t happy with his life.

I know this story because I am that guy. Or at least I was that guy: Joshua Millburn, the unhappy young executive. And this is my story about why I quit my job to pursue my passions and live a meaningful life, and I’m going to show you how and why you should pursue your passions too, why you must live a meaningful life if you want to be happy.

This journey started because I was tired of not being happy, plain and simple. Yes, I had a “great” job by cultural standards. But working 70 to 80 hours per week for a corporation was not cutting it for me. Not that working for a company is inherently bad or evil or wrong, it’s not. In fact, I had a lot of mixed emotions about leaving my job. I love a lot of the people there, and there were a ton of things I enjoyed about the job itself: I enjoyed leading people, I enjoyed developing people and helping them see their true potential, and I got used to the comforts that the big salary afforded me.

But I was empty inside. I was not living a meaningful life, I was not fulfilled or satisfied, and I certainly was not free. That’s because I wasn’t doing what I really wanted to do. I wasn’t pursuing my passions. I wasn’t living my mission.

Instead, I made six figures per year but got further into debt every time I got a pay raise. I was trying to buy happiness. I was trying to fill the void with things, attempting to give meaning to that which has no meaning.

And over the course of a year—in late 2009 and early 2010—my life came crashing down in front of me. It was as if I had no power over my life as it collapsed before my eyes. In 2009 my mother fell victim to cancer and I watched her die slowly and painfully as she battled it. Shortly thereafter, my marriage crumbled and it was completely my fault. During that time, my job became mundane and what I once thought was my mission in life became void of any meaning. And to top it off, my fiction writing—my true passion—halted. It was around that time that I stopped caring about life, and my mental and physical health deteriorated. I was flying in ever-diminishing circles.

It’s sad that it took that series of life-altering events to wake me up, to make me take massive action to become more free, to find meaning in my life.

In 2010 I stumbled across the concepts minimalism and simplicity and unstoppable passion. More specifically, I stumbled across a handful of blogs that opened a door in my mind and changed my life and led me to today (N.B. prior to discovering these blogs, I never even read blogs and thought they were generally a waste of time). I first discovered Paid to Exist as well as Everett Bogue’s, Joshua Becker’s, and Leo Babauta’s blogs via Twitter; I was intrigued by their stories, which lead me to other interesting sites.

All of these people had different stories and different perspectives on living a more meaningful life, and yet their fundamental message was the same: the stuff in your life is not going to make you happy, and there is another way to live your life, a way in which you can grow as a person and contribute to others in a meaningful way, a way in which you can be happy and fulfilled and passionate and free.

The life that these people were living was the life that I wanted to live—not that I wanted their lives, but I wanted the freedom that their lifestyles afforded them—so I adopted the principals of minimalism and applied them to my life. I got rid of unnecessary things so I could focus on what’s important in my life, so I could focus on relationships and pursuing my passions and living a meaningful life.

So, What Can You Do?

Great question. I’m so glad you asked.

First, you must identify your passions. This one is easy for some people, and you might already know the answer. If you do, that’s great.

Me? My Passion? I would write fiction. Hell, I would write fiction until my eyes fell out and my fingers were bleeding on my keyboard. Sound passionate enough?

What about you? What is your passion? Do you want to start a business? Do you want to teach children? Do you want to start a blog? Do you want to write a novel? Do you want to become a scientist? Do you want to travel the world?

Second, you must identify your mission in life. This one’s a little more tricky and even a bit philosophical. Sometimes, if you’re very lucky, your mission is the same thing as your passion, but it’s OK if it’s different too (it’s different for me).

Another way to look at this is to ask yourself, “What is the meaning of my life?” OK, I’ll admit, this is an extremely complex and abstruse question. The good news is that I’ve spent years thinking about it and helping other people with this same question (I led a large group of people for a long time and helped them understand their goals; I have a decade leadership under by belt).

So let’s remove the complexities of this question. Regardless of the answer’s specificity, the answer always revolves around two things:

  • Personal Growth
  • Contributing to Other People.

In other words, the meaning of my life is to grow as an individual and to contribute to other people in a meaningful way. And the good news is that you get to decide how you’re going to do both.

Growth. I grow in several ways, most notably:

  • Writing & Reading (mostly literary fiction) strengthens my mind and my craftsmanship, and it also strengthens my relationships because we have interesting topics to discuss.
  • Exercise (daily) strengthens my overall physical and mental health.
  • Relationships allow me to connect with others to get new ideas and learn more about myself through conversation.

Contribution. I contribute to others in several ways too:

  • Charity & Community Outreach. I donate my time to charitable organizations, I also organize larger teams to participate at local community outreach events.
  • Coaching and Mentoring. I help others when they are looking for direction.
  • Writing. Great writing contributes to readers in a special way. Great writing can connect with another person on a level that other forms of entertainment are incapable of doing.

How about you? In what ways do you grow? In what ways do you contribute? How would you like to grow and contribute? Make a list and pick your top three in each category. Focus on those, they are your mission.

Liberating Yet Terrifying

Once you do this—once you discover your passion and mission—it’s eye opening. It’s liberating, but it’s also terrifying.

It’s liberating because everything changes for you. You feel new and excited and free. Now you have something to focus on, and your life has a purpose, it has a meaning.

It’s terrifying because you realize that the life you’ve been living has been total bullshit, you realize that you must change, because if you don’t change then you’re essentially dead.

This might sound like hyperbole or exaggeration, but I assure you it’s not. It’s the cold truth. You are either living a meaningful life or you are dead inside.

Burn The Boat

You’ve most likely heard that little old parable before, the one in which the warriors arrive on the island and burn their boats so they are forced to stay and fight because they have no other alternative. They must fight and win or die trying. There’s no turning back.

On February 28, 2011, I burned my boat. That was my last day at my big corporate job. March 1, 2011, was my first day of freedom, the first day of my real life, my new life. This year I will focus on my passion (primarily writing) and on my mission (growth and contribution). I will publish my first novel AS A DECADE FADES towards the end of the year (my passion). I will publish content on our site that helps people change their lives (my passion and mission). I will spend a lot more time contributing to others through charity and mentoring (my mission). And I will help you if you need my help.

Burning your boat is also terrifying. You begin to think things like, What am I going to do for money? and What if I end up broke, will I be homeless? and What if I’m not successful at pursuing my passions? and What if I’m making a terrible mistake?

You will probably think all of these things—and many other things—at some point in time. I did. It’s natural. We’ve been conditioned to think this way. You are going against the status quo, and there is going to be some push back for it. Your friends might think you’re insane, your co-workers won’t understand, your family might think you’re lazy. So what! Those things don’t mean anything if you’re not pursuing your passions, if you’re not happy. Plus the Paid to Exist folks already showed you how to talk about this with your loved ones.

Burning your boat means that you must be successful: you are leaving yourself no options other than success. Nothing to fall back on, no safety net. You will find a way to succeed.

This doesn’t mean that you can live the same lifestyle that you lived before though. The house with the two extra guest bedrooms isn’t going to cut it. The $600 car payment isn’t going to cut it. Continuously buying stuff isn’t going to cut it. You will have to drastically adjust your lifestyle if you want to pursue your passions.

But I don’t have enough money to change my life, you might say. Really? Everett Bogue did it with just $3,000. He also wrote the book (literally) on how to make money with a Minimalist Business while pursuing your passions.

But I have a family and kids to take care of, you might say. Well, Joshua Becker has a wife and two children, but he is living his mission and is living a minimalist lifestyle.

No matter what excuse you have, there is a way around it. You know it’s true.

Screw You, I Quit!

The “screw you” here is a bit more subtle than it sounds. I didn’t barrel into by boss’s office and yell “screw you, I quit!” In fact, I had no desire to do so. My former boss is an amazing guy, one who taught me a lot about life.

So, my “screw you” is not to my former job.

Instead, my “screw you” here is to my old lifestyle, to my old life, to a life without meaning. I’m not just quitting a job—the job is not the point here—I’m quitting the life that I lived, and I’m committed to living a meaningful life, one in which I do what I love.

And you can do it too.

I didn’t quit with some big savings account to live off of for a while (the life I was living didn’t allow me to build up some sort of huge nest egg). But I took Jonathan’s advice, and I have enough money to live off of for a few months as a safety net, because I will live a simple life with few expenses. And you can do the same thing. You can refuse to be a slave to your current circumstances and to live a more meaningful life. You can pursue you passions.

That’s what I’m doing starting today. I refuse to be a slave to culture expectations, ensnared by the trappings of money and power and status and perceived success. So, to my old life, I bid you farewell. Oh, and screw you, I quit!

About the Author: Joshua Millburn writes essays with Ryan Nicodemus about living a more meaningful life at The Minimalists. Hit the link to check out some of their essays. Follow on Twitter.

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photo courtesy of r’eyes

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101 Comments on "Screw You, I Quit!"

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Bojan
Guest

Inspiring story… I always watched my father, doing what you were doing. I never intended to get a “proper job”, and I am striving to fulfill my passion and I am doing a great job at it.

I am happy, knowing that I am doing something that will make me happy in the long run…

Joshua Millburn
Guest

Good for you. Yes, it’s important to pursue our passions if we want to feel fulfilled. Sounds like you are taking action pursue yours.

Nate
Guest

Congrats Joshua! I think a key message in your article is this:

Every situation is workable…and you need to start where you are

Limiting beliefs and stories we create can get in our way and prevent us from being happy.

I can’t do that b/c I have a family
It won’t work
I don’t have the time

It’s good to be aware of these thoughts and really question them. It’s wonderful to see that you rose above many of the doubts and fears you may have had (and heck, may still have) and went on with it anyway.

Nate

Joshua Millburn
Guest

Exactly, every situation is workable, every situation is a starting point from which we can take action.

Kyle long
Guest

Hey so I should be a comedian and move to Austin?

Dandy
Guest

Hi Joshua!
Thanks for sharing your story. It’s important that we define success and happiness for ourselves. The cultural definition doesn’t suit us all, especially those of us who yearn to take the road less traveled. Thanks again for the excellent post!

Joshua Millburn
Guest

Bingo! Thanks for the compliment. Yes, success and happiness are measured internally, not with the stuff in our lives.

Joshua Millburn
Guest

Jonathan,

Thanks for the opportunity to share this with the world. I appreciate it.

Joshua Millburn

Cedric
Admin

Thanks for contributing Joshua. It’s a pleasure to have you. I’m sure a lot of people will be inspired reading it.

Antonio
Guest
Good afternoon Joshua, I have to say, I can relate to your story. I’m about to turn 27 on the 19th of this month and I’m working towards becoming an executive at my job. I’m a hard worker so I’m willing to put in 70 – 90 hours a week. I keep telling myself that this is what I want. I want the big house, Nice suits, watches, suits, cars, and everything that comes with it. Want to have the freedom to treat my family and friends. As I read more stories of people like yourself. I start to realize… Read more »
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[…] Screw You, I Quit! (Jonathan Mead’s Illuminated Mind) […]

Tessa Zeng
Guest

Reading Linchpin by Godin right now, and this touches on so many of those principles- lizard brain, leave yourself no backup- only in action. Glorious! Also, hi fellow novelist-in-the-works!

Joshua Millburn
Guest

Hello fellow novelist :)

Yes, burning the boat was a big (difficult) decision, but was very important.

Radman
Guest

I was wondering who took my notebook (daily writings/diary). I need it back! Never mind – I’m moving on. Enjoy.

Lee Knowlton
Guest

Great post Joshua, you eloquently hit on a lot of things I’ve tried to put into words.

I’m coming from a different place having just graduated college but your advice is relevant and inspiring nonetheless.

I will definitely be reading more of your work and I’m sure it will help me on my own quest.

Joshua Millburn
Guest

Thanks, Lee. I’m glad you enjoyed the essay and hope you’re pursuing your passions.

Rich Proctor
Guest

This is beautifully written.

I find myself in the middle of a similar transition myself. Your words have inspired me to summon the courage and continue the transition into more meaningful and fulfilling existence. The existence that I was created to live.

Thankfully I don’t have the high powered (and high paying) job to sacrifice, which makes it easier I think. I come from a dead-end job background (a fact that is a major component of my mission).

Thank you so much.

Joshua Millburn
Guest

Yes, leaving a job I didn’t hate wasn’t easy (it was often comfortable), but I wanted to pursue what I’m passionate about. Thanks for the comment about my writing; I appreciate it.

Max Bronson
Guest

Hi Johshua,

This post inspires me to keep going. I am in the process of building my own business from home. I love being my own boss. It doesn’t mean it’s easy. In fact, it requires a hell of a lot of self-discipline to work without a boss. I don’t know if you’ve discovered this yet. :)

Anyway, I just want to encourage you to keep going and make sure you’re advancing everyday towards eventually being able to get a steady enough income from your writing and other ventures. I have a feeling you’ll succeed. :)

Joshua Millburn
Guest

Thank you for your kind words, Max. I appreciate it. Thanks for taking the time to comment too.

Walt Hampton
Guest

This is a spectacular piece. Both meaningful and practical. Thank you for exposing us to Joshua’s work. Walt

Joshua Millburn
Guest

Walt, thanks for the complimentary words. I appreciate them. And thank you for finding my work. Looking forward to interacting.

Leto
Guest

Your story is so eerily similar to mine, I feel a sort of giddy nausea. The six-figure salary, the impressive title, the massive debt, the passion for fiction writing and helping people. This is me.

Today I ran into three different people who all represent the change I need to make in my life. Completely random; one person I hadn’t seen in years. When I got home there in my email was yet another sign — and the words, “Screw you, I quit!” were like a miracle.

Joshua and Jonathan, you give me hope. Thank you.

Joshua Millburn
Guest

Outstanding! Good luck on your journey. Let me know if I can help.

Eric Chaump
Guest
Joshua I can’t begin to tell you how powerful this post was. It’s the story of a person, like myself, who looks at others and says, “Man I want to be just like him. With his fancy house and sports cars.” I’m 23 years old, have a good entry level job out of college, currently pursuing my MBA, and just bought a nice, small house with my Fiance. I’d like to think I’ve been pretty successful so far. But everyday, I can’t wait until I can be the guy with the REALLY nice house, nice cars, nice suits, nice…everything. But,… Read more »
Joshua Millburn
Guest

Eric, better to rethink it now than 10 years from now. Congrats for acknowledging this.

David (Edge of David)
Guest

Cool, I did the same thing back in 08 by leaving PwC. Great job, but I got burned out by the 70+ hour weeks. Seriously, who the hell wants to work from 815 in the morning to 11:30 at night for a client. Not me. Screw that :)

Joshua Millburn
Guest

Amen!

Mirella
Guest
I just love it when a post pops up in your inbox at exactly the moment you need to read it most :) I am transitioning away from “work” as we know it, with 2011 being the last year of “work” for me. What is surprising me most is the feelings of guilt and the thoughts of unworthiness that are currently plaguing me. Your advice that this sort of freaking out is natural when we oppose the status quo really clicked with me and was like a breathe of fresh air. So thank you :) I’ve also been pondering how… Read more »
Joshua Millburn
Guest

Glad that you found this at the right time. Yes, growth and contribution are the meaning for life for me. Try it and I bet it changes your perspective long term.

Sean M Kelly
Guest
Hi Joshua Great story. It’s amazing how we can capture so much of our lives in a few paragraphs yet while we’re going through all its challenges it can go on for years! Your zest for life comes across greatly in your article. My father died in 1999 and after that I absolutely decided to invest more time nourishing what was truly important to me in my life. One was my music and now it has become a huge part of my life and brings me great peace. Yesterday I bagpiped at a funeral and in those moments when I… Read more »
Joshua Millburn
Guest

Congrats on pursuing your musical passion. It makes life feel so much more fulfilling, doesn’t it?

Clarity
Guest

“No matter what excuse you have, there is a way around it. You know it’s true.” Although I already know this certaintly a lesson I needed to learn.

Joshua Millburn
Guest

It’s funny how we know a lot of things intuitively (or intellectually) but we have trouble acting on them emotionally.

Thanks for commenting.

Hans Hageman
Guest

Congratulations, Joshua! The “burning your boat” piece is critical. I’m 53, married with several children and I left a six-figure position last year to maintain my integrity. It’s scary but I have no regrets.

I look forward to watching you on your journey.

Joshua Millburn
Guest

Hans, congrats to you. I’m looking forward to interacting with you as well.

Heather Dakota
Guest

Since I’m standing on the edge looking over into the huge abyss of working for myself. This was a fantastic article and a huge inspiration.

Joshua Millburn
Guest

Heather, I’m glad it found you at the right time. Funny how things work sometime, eh? I’m also glad you found value in this essay. I hope I can add more value for you in the future.

Matt
Guest

Josh,

you have me dreaming again, instead of settling. Thank you.

Joshua Millburn
Guest

Matt, WOW! What a great comment. Thank you, I’m flattered.

Justin | Mazzastick
Guest

That’s a very powerful story, I know where your coming from.

Many people make this discovery at one point in their life.Material things are nice but they will never cause you to feel content.

Joshua Millburn
Guest

Amen! Contentment is within us, not within our things.

Philip
Guest
A very inspirational post, Joshua! Your story is really impressive, I don’t know a lot of people who would commit so fully to turning their lives around so completely. My road towards my passion has just begun, with graduate school applications coming up this winter. It’s inspiring to hear about such a headlong dive into the unknown in order to find the meaning in life. It really is so important that we care and feel passionate about what we do with our time, that we contribute something to the world, and so many people lose sight of that. For my… Read more »
Joshua Millburn
Guest

Thanks, Phil. I really appreciate the comment and the compliments. Good luck on your journey as well.

Zac
Guest
Hi Joshua, This is my first time commenting on this blog, although I found it over a year ago. Like you, I never used to read blogs, and then as fate would have it I’ve found so many inspiring blogs 2 years later, with so much go advice and inspiration that I can’t keep up. It’s funny how we’re all connected, and how many people can relate to your story. My story is similar to yours. I left my corporate job after 5 years to pursue what I’m passionate about, and strive to live the kind of life that I… Read more »
Joshua Millburn
Guest

Zac, thanks, man. Good luck with your journey and with pursuing your passions; it sounds like we have a similar story. Thanks for taking the time to leave your first comment here, I’m happy that I could elicit such a response. And you’re dead on: it’s about feeling alive, which pursuing your passions allows you to feel.

Kid
Guest

This rings true with every person on the planet. Most people are on autopilot, just doing what they “think” they should be doing based on what others “think” they should be doing. It’s amazing when one realizes what their mission is, and aligns their life with that mission. It takes courage, but it’s worth it.

Material things can be very cool if aligned with your purpose. having “things” just to display status is a pathway to misery. It keeps one trapped and small.

Joshua Millburn
Guest

I totally agree. We can become a slave to our stuff without even knowing it. Thanks for leaving such a thoughtful comment.

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[…] want to travel the world but are afraid of the consequences… read this article, now: “Screw You, I Quit“.  I am a huge fan of the idea that people should “burn the boats” in order to […]

Kim
Guest
Awesome. I am in the process of selling my stuff, quitting my job and setting off to travel the world. I have a great, well-paying, stable job. I own a house. I have everything I could want and more, but I’m not living my dream, which is to be a writer and travel the world. Your story (and mine) remind me of my favorite quote “If your success is not on your own terms, if it looks good to the world but does not feel good in your heart, it is not success at all.”- Anna Quindlin
Joshua Millburn
Guest

Kim, that’s a great quote. Thanks for sharing. Best of luck on your journey. Congrats!

Cynthia
Guest

Brilliant article, Joshua. I resonate so strongly with it. :) Thank you for writing it.

Joshua Millburn
Guest

You’re welcome. And thank you for reading it. I appreciate it.

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[…] You’ve most likely heard that little old parable before, the one in which the warriors arrive on the island and burn their boats so they are forced to stay and fight because they have no other alternative. They must fight and win or die trying. There’s no turning back. […]

Kenjie
Guest

You inspire confidence in me…You have a beautiful heart,Sir…I can feel it!

Joshua Millburn
Guest

Kenjie, thank you. I’m glad you were inspired. I hope you take action as well.

Linda Wagner - Nutrition to Invigorate Mind, Body & Spirit
Guest

Loved this article. This is EXACTLY what I did on Dec 11, 2010 and I’ve never looked back. My life is fuller, richer, and more gratifying than I could have imagined!

Joshua Millburn
Guest

Congrats. Sounds like we are certainly on the same page.

Jackie
Guest

Joshua

I am approaching 49 this year and some introspection and self reflection is going on for me.

I have been reading a LOT of stuff around finding your place in the world and so on.

No one has made the whole process as succint as you by bringing it down to 2 elements in the way you have.

Thank you so much for writing the article is is such a useful piece of writing.

My best wishes

Jackie

Joshua Millburn
Guest

Thanks, Jackie. Good luck to you.

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[…] absolutely LOOOOOOOOOOOOOVE this article – Screw You, I Quit!! It is basically the exact same thing I […]

Gandhi
Guest

Hi Joshua,
Excellent article. Very close to my thoughts.,
Couple of thoughts for the people who read this blog.,
* Don’t blame your employers for your inability to follow your dreams.
* The salary your are getting is not only for what you contribute to the organization., it is the cost of your dreams as well.

Joshua Millburn
Guest

Amen! Well said.

Michael
Guest

Amazing and inspiring article! Similarly, I said “Screw you, I quit!” on April 1st, 2011. It’s been an interesting month of adjustment for me but I am absolutely sure it was the right decision – no looking back now!

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[…] Less need for income equals being able to leave a soul crushing job. […]

Andrew
Guest

Congratulations Joshua, wish you all the best. Our situations are a strangely similar.. (actually not so strangely, nearly everyone I know is in this boat!)

In regards to finding your passion, do you think that contributing to other people in a meaningful way (coaching, showing them how to be ‘free’) is a bit of a cop out in a ponzi scheme sense?

Joshua Millburn
Guest

That’s interesting. I think it could be, depending on one’s motivation. That was the one aspect of my last job that I loved though. I was really good at it too (toots own horn).

I do see your point though, it becomes a bit of a double-bind to make money this way. Hopefully I offset it with enough charity work in my community.

Miles
Guest

Great article!
side note: Colin Wright’s link is broken. :)

Joshua Millburn
Guest

Thanks, Miles. Good to hear from you.

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[…] I wrote an essay about leaving my corporate job to pursue my passions and live my mission: Screw You, I Quit! You can also check out Day 19 of our journey for […]

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[…] I wrote an essay about leaving my corporate job to pursue my passions and live my mission: Screw You, I Quit! You can also check out Day 19 of our journey for […]

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[…] follow-up essay nails it.  Another great follow-up — this guy is […]

AdelinaBadea
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Inspiring

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[…] first time I met Jonathan Mead, he asked me if he should call me Joshua or Josh. My answer was simple (although it’s answer […]

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[…] Screw You, I Quit! — Illuminated Mind […]

spiritsentient
Guest
Awesome post Joshua, and sentiments echo’d by myself and many more in these circles. My story: I quit my job with no safety net 6 years ago, and during those 6 years I poured my heart and soul into 8 unsustainable businesses. (Jonathan + most others DO NOT recommend this path. Hell, I don’t even recommend this path, but it opened doors, and gave me the street cred and badges of honor I need to impact others lives in deep, far-reaching ways.) All of my businesses were ‘failures’ (I have a guest post on this coming up soon for Danny… Read more »
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deniseestewart
Guest

Every time I read something by Joshua Fields Millburn, I walk away with a stronger resolve. He’s a constant source of inspiration as I continue on my own path to a more meaningful life. Thanks for a great post.

JoshuaLance1
Guest

Great article! I’m 40 and I am about to start the next chapter in my life next week by traveling to South Korea to teach English and pursue my art career. I sold my car, gave up many possessions and left New Mexico last month and moved in with my dad until I leave next week. I sold 9 paintings to someone on Ebay so that part is great, I just want to continue everything while I’m in Asia. It’s great to be inspired and be around inspiring people, keep up the good work.

jessica4stein
Guest
Hi, Just stumble upon this one. You described exactly how I felt in 2009-2010 before I was laid off (voluntarily) with handsome severance.  I chose to walk out the door instead of hanging on because corporate life had no meaning to me anymore.  I didn’t hate my job, I didn’t love it either, although the paycheck was quite alright.  It was just pure boredom and I didn’t like the future me I was becoming… retired after 30 years of service… No No No.    I spent almost two years doing nothing ;) just some travelling. Amazing time.  Now it’s time… Read more »
choky
Guest

i have been 1.5 months after my resignation.
i am in between happy, afraid, and confuse what to do next.
i have dreams. big one.
but mercury poisoning kill almost all my energy. left me feel lethargic all the time.
also, i must quit in order to do some extensive mercury detoxification which is impossible to do when i am still at 95 work.

pahl
Guest
One important thing to remember and this is a BIG BIG thing, If you want to use probabilities and roll the dice, you can at 20-30 chuck it and move your life to something simple. People talk about cutting out cable, sell the house, sell the car but one thing pales in comparison by a HUGE margin, health care. You may be lucky and at 20-30 it may not seem important. But and this is a BIG BUT, you will need it one day and to even go without it at a young age is rolling the dice. A major… Read more »
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[…] The truth is you don’t need our permission. Quitting your job is incredibly easy. Simply walk into your boss’s office and say Screw you, I quit! […]

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[…] by all means, don’t walk into your boss’s office this morning and tell him, “Screw you, I quit!”  Because a lot of people can manage to find a job they really enjoy and not drive […]

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